June 8th to June 30th – B12 shots just $15

June 8th to June 30th – B12 shots just $15

B12 injections are regularly $30 at our Parliament location, but for the month of June only, our patients get 50% off! Vitamin B12 is a water-soluble vitamin that keeps your nerves and red blood cells healthy. It is responsible for the smooth functioning of several critical body processes. It is possible for the body to develop a vitamin B12 deficiency. This deficiency is usually reported with symptoms of fatigue. B12 can be used to treat a variety of disorders including osteoporosis, diabetes, asthma, allergies, depression and sleep disorders. What Can You Expect? Increase in energy and concentration Improved Sleep Patterns, and feeling alert during the day Maintain a healthier lifestyle Nerve Cells & Red Blood Cells Helps to Prevent Depression & Fatigue B12 has even been reported to help with reducing allergies and improving daily stamina. With summer just around the corner, our lifestyles become more focused outdoors and active. If your next visit to the clinic includes a B12 shot, this summer you can take advantage of everything the weather has to offer you and your family. Don’t be stuck inside stuffed-up and napping on the couch! Book your appointment today by calling 647-352-5527 or emailing us at...

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9 Points to Using Your Naturopathic Health Coverage Benefits

9 Points to Using Your Naturopathic Health Coverage Benefits

It’s nearly the end of 2014, and many people are thinking about their extended health care plans. While naturopathic medicine is not covered by OHIP, it may be part of your benefits package through your employer. Dr. Mai Heath shares some points to consider about making the most of your benefits package to improve your health!   1. You may have extended health coverage and not know it. Many extended health care plans in North America cover naturopathic medical treatment. Contact your employer & insurance company to find out what your particular benefits are.   2. Not all coverage plans are created equal. Extended health care benefits may cover a variety of services from naturopathic medicine, physiotherapy, osteopathy, massage therapy, doula care, chiropractics, and more. Packages vary in the configuration of services that are provided coverage.   3. Don’t waste them. They are part of your salary. Having an extended health plan is a valuable asset. It is your right to use your benefits, not a privilege. You work and make sacrifices for your health coverage. Do not let them go to waste. Covered health services are a part of your compensation for the service you provide the company you work with. Therefore, they are a part of your salary.   4. Naturopathic Medicine can help you improve your job performance. Studies show that workers & employers alike benefit from naturopathic medicine. Natural therapies are associated with improved quality of life and less time away from work. It is also found to be more cost-effective than many conventional treatments and pain medication.   5. If you don’t use it, you loose it. Most insurance plans renew at the start of the calendar year. Very much like paid leave, benefits do not tend to carry over to the next calendar year. Therefore, should you fail to use health benefits before the end of the year they will expire and you will not be able to use these benefits. That’s like paying several hundreds to thousands of dollars in overdraft fees to your bank. That’s one heck of a penalty!   6. Family & loved ones in need can benefit (through you). Contact your employer & insurance company to find out the particulars of your coverage. You may be pleasantly surprised to find you have coverage for family, children, spouse, common law spouse, partners, and/or dependents. Don’t rob your loved ones of this opportunity for care.   7. But I don’t have insurance coverage! What about me? While many North Americans have extended healthcare benefits, not all do. Many of my patients don’t have coverage for naturopathic treatments. These patients pay fee for service and generally find that the improvement to their quality...

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The Ins and Outs of Naturopathic Doula Care

The Ins and Outs of Naturopathic Doula Care

Doula means “woman who serves,” but it might as well mean “safe space.” Doulas offer never-ending support without judgment or shame. We will rest with you, watch over you, listen to you meticulously, remember for you, and remind you of your goals and wishes when you forget or feel compromised. Doulas testify to the transformative moments when women become mothers and partners become parents & caregivers. We hold space for freedom in making changes, see you when you are compromised, and provide an advocate’s voice to keep you focused on your goals. Doulas are equipped to help you meet your fears head on and put them in their place.   Naturopathic Doulas differ from Conventional Doulas A naturopathic doula is both a naturopathic doctor  and a labour and delivery doula. ND Doulas differ from conventional doulas in that we bring naturopathic modalities into the birth room to aid with energy, mood, labour progression/augmentation, & pain management. These tools range and often include acupuncture/acupressure, homeopathy, massage techniques, hydrotherapy, & visualization.   Doulas differ from a loved one Though generally considered a confidant, doulas have a degree of objectivity that is not privy to a loved one whose life is also actively transforming during the labour and delivery process. This tends to mean that your doula can bear the weight of seeing you labor & experiencing the degree of sensation and stimuli necessary to birth your baby, all the while being a constant strength (with a clear mind) for you to balance your resolve on.   Concern: Doulas replace fathers/birthing partners during labour & delivery. In Truth: Doulas offer support to the partner, highlight their experience, teach them manual techniques to provide physical comfort to mom, free up their focus for emotional & sensual communication with mom.   Concern: Doulas attend ‘natural births’ which are generally ‘water births’ or ‘home births’ without pharmaceutical pain management or intervention. In Truth: Birth is natural. No matter how a mother births her baby a doula can provide valuable support. Birthing mothers in hospital and at birth centres often need the advocacy a doula can provide the most. While moms birthing at home often need the pain management, encouragement, & brainstorming a doula can provide the most.   Concern: If you have a midwife, you don’t need a doula. In Truth: Doulas differ from midwives in that midwives (like OBGYNs) prioritize the medical aspects of the birthing process (fetal heart rate monitors, pharmaceutical management, blood pressure, cervical dilation, effacement, etc). A doula’s priority is to meet each moment of the process (each contraction, each choice, each breath) with the laboring mother and address emotional, spiritual, ritual, informational, and transformational needs. Additionally, doulas do NOT “catch” (deliver)...

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Managing Diabetes with your Naturopath

Managing Diabetes with your Naturopath

Millions of people have diabetes mellitus in North America, and hundreds of thousands are being diagnosed from year to year. This chronic disease results when the body is not able to make or use the hormone insulin. Insulin is necessary to convert sugar into energy. In diabetes, sugar circulates in the blood longer than it should causing internal organ damage. Most often tissues in the eye, nerves, heart, and kidneys are targeted. There are various types of diabetes. Type 1 is also called juvenile diabetes as it usually effects children and teens. Type 1.5 is “late onset” or adult Type 1. Type 2 diabetes is due to lifestyle and traditionally has had an adult onset though recently it is occurring more and more in children. Poor food quality, over eating, sedentary lifestyles, and obesity increase the prevalence of diabetes. Diabetes Type 1.5 is a relatively new diagnosis. Gestational diabetes (GD) occurs in pregnant women. Though temporary, it predisposes the child and mother to developing diabetes later in life. GD is one of the primary health concerns during pregnancy and can often result in larger baby size and complications during delivery. GD should be screen regularly during pregnancy and managed from a multifaceted approach. Addressing the autoimmune or lifestyle aspects of diabetes is key. Managing blood glucose levels is imperative. Lifestyle factors such as quitting smoking, maintaining a healthy weight, regular exercise, and healthy eating habits all benefit management. Your healthcare practitioner will help you tailor your diet to one that supports stable glucose control, including maximizing whole foods, fiber, and foods that require the body to need less insulin hormone to convert it in to energy. Exercise benefits all body systems and has the benefit of helping reduce blood sugar levels. It is important to limit alcohol, refined foods, and foods high in sugar. Eat several small meals throughout the day to maintain your blood glucose levels. Managing diabetes is a whole-system issue, and prime for a naturopathic approach. Naturopathic medicine is both evidence based medicine and traditional medicine. Evidenced-based trials support the benefits of various minerals, herbs, and foods that improve glucose control or manage secondary concerns resulting from Type 2 diabetes such as neuralgia. Adversely, there is also evidence that caffeine worsens glucose control profoundly. One major difference between medicine being therapeutic and toxic is the dosage. Visit a properly trained naturopathic doctor or credible healthcare practitioner to get information about how these interventions may be incorporated into a health care plan for you and how to properly incorporate an exercise regime.   Dr. Mai Heath, ND, is a doula, mother, wife, and Naturopathic Doctor. Mai has a special interest in pediatrics, perinatal care, and lifestyle counselling. You can...

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Health Benefits of Black Tea

Health Benefits of Black Tea

Teas are one of the many tools Naturopathic doctors use to aid patients. They’re gentle and have a wide selection herbal and caffeinated varieties. One in particular in the rich, full-bodied, Black Tea. I don’t mean taking your beverage plain, I mean the antioxidant-laden, most often caffeinated, Black Tea aka Orange Pekoe, Chai, English breakfast, Earl grey… Besides being quite tasty, this variety has significant therapeutic benefits due to it’s various properties (polyphenols, astringent, theaflavins, etc). Black teas can be used to effect the Central Nervous System, alertness, wean down from caffeine abuse, regulate bowel movements & bowel consistency, regulate the Immune System, allergies, promoting Renal function, boost metabolism, effect the Circulatory System, blood cholesterol levels, and a host of other concerns. Like all things therapeutic, Black tea should not be used for treatment without assessing the total picture. Black tea has tannins, which can effect how well your gut absorbs nutrients & other constituents. While antioxidant, it’s not as powerful an antioxidant as a green or white tea. I’d love to toss some ideas around about your health over tea for 15 minutes or so. I may pour you a cup of Black tea or give you some info on another variety or two. When you come to me, I’m happy to work around your schedule. I look forward to sharing an experience with you! Best in Health, Mai Heath ND Doula Come Tea & Chat with Dr. Heath, ND   Resources & References Natural medicine comprehensive database Distinctly tea Inc distinctlytea.com Dr. Keila Roesner   Dr. Mai Heath practices in Cabbagetown, Toronto at Paths to Vitality. She received her medical training from the Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine. Mai believes the therapeutic relationship is where the healing occurs. Educating patients on how to steer their own health outcomes is a conviction she’s developed after many years of work in education. Mai focuses her energies on total patient care through the mental, emotional, social, physical, and spiritual healing process. Eagerly guiding people on their wellness journey through individualized care and education leads to empowered and inspired communities. Mai has a special interest in perinatal care, family care, and lifestyle...

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Movember

Movember

As the month of November draws to a close, the fabulous displays of manliness and mo’ pride impress us more every day. Everything from the David Suzuki to the Charlie Chaplin to the Mark Twain to the… A.T. Still? Yes, even the founder of Osteopathy had some excellent facial hair.   Whatever the shape of your ‘stache, we give a big thank you to all the men and women who raised funds around the world in support of prostate cancer research this month. We salute your MO-mentous achievements, even if the sides didn’t quite grow in the way you wanted them to.   Osteopathy can assist in the prevention of prostate issues. To understand how we can help, let’s have an in-depth look at the anatomy of the prostate gland.   Anatomy of the Prostate Gland   The Encyclopedia Britannica Online describes the prostate as a male reproductive organ that surrounds the urethra, and serves as a passage for both urine and semen.   Henry Gray defined the prostate as a firm partly glandular and partly muscular body.  He landmarks were within the pelvic cavity above the superior fascia of the urogenital diaphragm and in front of the rectum.  The arteries supplying the prostate arise from the pudendal, inferior vesical, and middle hemorrhoidal.  The prostates veins receive from the dorsal vein of the penis, merge to become a plexus surrounding the gland and then empty into the hypogastric veins.   Lymphatic drainage occurs in the internal iliac lymph node. Sympathetic innervation is supplied by the superior lumbar and hypogastric nerves.  These nerves are responsible for the speed of contraction during ejaculation.  The parasympathetic innervation is derived from the pelvic splanchnic and inferior hypogastric plexus.   In The Practice of Osteopathy, McConnell and Teall propose the secretory branches of the prostate gland are from the sacral nerves.  Its sensory contribution is located at the tenth, eleventh (twelfth) dorsal, first, second and third sacral as well as the fifth lumbar.   Its glandular function is to produce seminal fluid that contains fructose (energy for the sperm), amino acids, ascorbic acids and prostaglandins.   The Hypothalamus constantly monitors blood levels of testosterone.  When there are inadequate levels it releases GnRH(gonadotropin releasing hormone) and LHRH (Luteinizing hormone releasing hormone) to stimulate the pituitary.  Upon retrieval of this information the Pituitary releases both Gn (gonadotropin) and/or  LH (Luteinizing hormone).   The production of these two hormones affects the testes and produces increase blood testosterone levels.  Testosterone is known for stimulating the growth of the prostrate gland.  Testosterone will also power the growth of cancerous tissue because it cannot differentiate between normal tissue and abnormal.   Prostate Cancer   This is the most common cancer...

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