Osteopathy and Juvenile Arthritis

Osteopathy and Juvenile Arthritis

    Our friends at eRheumatology.tv asked Paths to Vitality to write an article focused on the benefits of Osteopathic manual therapy for patients suffering from Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). We were honoured to do so, and to share how treatment based in osteopathic principles can help ease and heal those struggling with this painful disease. The article is featured on their website, which is run by the Journal of Clinical Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Medicine, but read on for the full piece…       Osteopathy and Juvenile Arthritis Arthritis is a common concern for us as we age.  Unfortunately this degenerative disorder can affect all age groups.  The Arthritis Foundation proclaims that almost 300,000 children under the age of 18 are presently suffering from a rheumatologic condition.   Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) can be defined as a rheumatic autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation of the synovial tissue found in joints.   Numerous sources claim that there is no known cause for this disease, however various streams of science have shown a further understanding of its etiology.  It is important to remember that arthritic conditions display a complex multifactorial genesis.   After reviewing many research articles in Genetics, it is evident that one factor contributing to the existence of JRA is specific gene coding and the evolving mutations of these genes.  Phelan et al explored the chromosomal regions and the genes involved in the complex genetic traits of Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).  The research team examined various genetic polymorphisms associated with JIA and concluded that there are two sets of susceptible genes consistent with its development.  The first set includes alleles which the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) polymorphisms contribute to subtype-specific pathologies. The second was that there are specific susceptibility genes which are common to most autoimmune disorders, and this combination equates to a loss of tolerance to self.   Hinks et al believe that there is strong evidence that this general susceptible gene is Interleukin-2-receptor alpha (IL2RA/CD25) because of its role with in the development and function of regulatory T cells and the association of single-nucleotide polymorphisms within this gene.   There are many hypothesis surrounding the importance of deciphering the role of specific gene adaptions with an autoimmune disease.   If we extend our research into histology more evidence can be found concerning the origin of JRA.  Baeten et al demonstrated in a comparison of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and spondyloarthorpathy (SpA) that synovial vascularity was compromised in cases of RA and that lymphocytes were overrepresented in RA compared to SpA.   This would suggest an obstruction to the natural fluid exchange in the local area.  Vascular compromise and a decreased ability to clear lymph cells leads to toxicity and tissue acidity,...

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