June 8th to June 30th – B12 shots just $15

June 8th to June 30th – B12 shots just $15

B12 injections are regularly $30 at our Parliament location, but for the month of June only, our patients get 50% off! Vitamin B12 is a water-soluble vitamin that keeps your nerves and red blood cells healthy. It is responsible for the smooth functioning of several critical body processes. It is possible for the body to develop a vitamin B12 deficiency. This deficiency is usually reported with symptoms of fatigue. B12 can be used to treat a variety of disorders including osteoporosis, diabetes, asthma, allergies, depression and sleep disorders. What Can You Expect? Increase in energy and concentration Improved Sleep Patterns, and feeling alert during the day Maintain a healthier lifestyle Nerve Cells & Red Blood Cells Helps to Prevent Depression & Fatigue B12 has even been reported to help with reducing allergies and improving daily stamina. With summer just around the corner, our lifestyles become more focused outdoors and active. If your next visit to the clinic includes a B12 shot, this summer you can take advantage of everything the weather has to offer you and your family. Don’t be stuck inside stuffed-up and napping on the couch! Book your appointment today by calling 647-352-5527 or emailing us at...

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Movember

Movember

As the month of November draws to a close, the fabulous displays of manliness and mo’ pride impress us more every day. Everything from the David Suzuki to the Charlie Chaplin to the Mark Twain to the… A.T. Still? Yes, even the founder of Osteopathy had some excellent facial hair.   Whatever the shape of your ‘stache, we give a big thank you to all the men and women who raised funds around the world in support of prostate cancer research this month. We salute your MO-mentous achievements, even if the sides didn’t quite grow in the way you wanted them to.   Osteopathy can assist in the prevention of prostate issues. To understand how we can help, let’s have an in-depth look at the anatomy of the prostate gland.   Anatomy of the Prostate Gland   The Encyclopedia Britannica Online describes the prostate as a male reproductive organ that surrounds the urethra, and serves as a passage for both urine and semen.   Henry Gray defined the prostate as a firm partly glandular and partly muscular body.  He landmarks were within the pelvic cavity above the superior fascia of the urogenital diaphragm and in front of the rectum.  The arteries supplying the prostate arise from the pudendal, inferior vesical, and middle hemorrhoidal.  The prostates veins receive from the dorsal vein of the penis, merge to become a plexus surrounding the gland and then empty into the hypogastric veins.   Lymphatic drainage occurs in the internal iliac lymph node. Sympathetic innervation is supplied by the superior lumbar and hypogastric nerves.  These nerves are responsible for the speed of contraction during ejaculation.  The parasympathetic innervation is derived from the pelvic splanchnic and inferior hypogastric plexus.   In The Practice of Osteopathy, McConnell and Teall propose the secretory branches of the prostate gland are from the sacral nerves.  Its sensory contribution is located at the tenth, eleventh (twelfth) dorsal, first, second and third sacral as well as the fifth lumbar.   Its glandular function is to produce seminal fluid that contains fructose (energy for the sperm), amino acids, ascorbic acids and prostaglandins.   The Hypothalamus constantly monitors blood levels of testosterone.  When there are inadequate levels it releases GnRH(gonadotropin releasing hormone) and LHRH (Luteinizing hormone releasing hormone) to stimulate the pituitary.  Upon retrieval of this information the Pituitary releases both Gn (gonadotropin) and/or  LH (Luteinizing hormone).   The production of these two hormones affects the testes and produces increase blood testosterone levels.  Testosterone is known for stimulating the growth of the prostrate gland.  Testosterone will also power the growth of cancerous tissue because it cannot differentiate between normal tissue and abnormal.   Prostate Cancer   This is the most common cancer...

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Grand Opening of Cabbagetown Clinic

  Come out to see our brand new clinic in Toronto’s historic Cabbagetown! We’ll be there Friday and Saturday to tour you around the space and talk about what Osteopathy can do for you. To book an appointment with one of our professional Osteopathic Manual Pracitioners for our new clinic, call...

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Osteopathy and Breast Cancer

Osteopathy and Breast Cancer

Breast Cancer Awareness Month   October is known for many things and breast cancer awareness is an important topic to discuss. Osteopathic manual practitioners deal with many issues in their clinics everyday so why would breast cancer be any different. In order to discuss how OMT can assist a patient who has a genetic predisposition for, is currently fighting or has dealt with a case of breast cancer we must understand the Structure and Function relationship. As we explore the intricate details of the mammary gland it is important to remember that it is a gland and receives a tremendous influence from the Endocrine, Nervous and Immune systems.   Anatomy of the Mammary Gland   The National Cancer Institute defines “the mammary gland as a glandular organ located on the chest. The mammary gland is made up of connective tissue, fat and tissue that contains the glands that can make milk.” As any true Osteopath would know this definition does not effectively describe the intricate details of the glands development, its function or how the rest of the body interacts with this specialized tissue.   Encyclopedia Britannica claims that the Mammary glands are regulated by the endocrine system and become functional in response to the hormonal changes associated with parturition. This definition is starting to explore the tissue in more depth but this still does not provide a complete understanding.   The breast tissue is a very specialized part of the female anatomy. Development is inactive until puberty when the anterior pituitary experiences increased activity. Glandular growth is primarily under the control of estrogen and progesterone stimulation.   During Pregnancy the breasts develop further due to rising levels of estrogen, progesterone, and prolactin. When nursing a mother will experience a neuro-endocrine reflex that will continue to influence prolactin release but will also cause oxytocin to contract the myoepithelial cells surrounding the lobules and ducts.   The breast receives blood supply from the lateral thoracic and acromio-thoracic branches of the axillary artery, and branches of the intercostal thoracic arteries. Venous drainage is into the axillary, internal thoracic, and intercostal veins. Lymphatic drainage is into the axillary nodes (anterior, posterior and lateral nodes and finally the apical) as well as infraclavicular group, the internal thoracic and intra-abdominal nodes.   There is no apparent central or parasympathetic nerve supply to the breast tissue. It does have innervation from sensory afferent somatic fibers which feed the hypothalamus and stimulate the anterior pituitary to release prolactin as well as the posterior pituitary to release oxytocin. Motor efferent fibers transmit impulses from the brain to cause reflex erection of the nipple and reflex vasoconstriction of arterial blood supply and therefore inhibition of milk flow.   The breast is made up of glands (also known as lobules) and ducts. These are the most common areas for the development of cancer.   Breast Cancer   The most common type of breast cancer is ductal carcinoma with the remaining...

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Laughing It Up for Habitat

Laughing It Up for Habitat

Want a good laugh? Want to help a great charity too? Come on out to Yuk Yuk’s Thursday, May 10th at 7p.m.!   Every year Nancy and I take part in a Habitat for Humanity trip to help build homes in communities around the world. This coming July we’re taking a team to Vietnam as part of Habitat’s Global Village Program. To help raise funds for the project, we’re hosting a comedy night at Yuk Yuk’s, located at 224 Richmond Street West.   Comedian Kate Davis of FunnyMommy.com headlines our show. Davis is a five-time nominee of the Canadian Comedy Awards and has been featured on CTV, the Comedy Network, TVO and Breakfast Television to name a few.   Tickets are $20 and can be purchased through Nancy or myself before the event. We’re hoping to sell all 104 tickets, so get yours before they sell...

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